Twitter warning: your account data is being sold

You iknow the spammer? Twply? Well, it’s worse than it seems. They now have your user name and password and are looking to sell your data to the highest bidder.

Twitter needs a real third-party authentication system and it needs it now. Thanks to Mark Trapp and other friendfeeders for bringing this to my attention.

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161 thoughts on “Twitter warning: your account data is being sold

  1. They already sold the site…for $1200. Now I don’t know what of the data is “going with” or what the semantics are, but given the site didn’t have a ton of big terms and conditions up front, and so on, it could be anything. Craziness.

    Like

  2. They already sold the site…for $1200. Now I don’t know what of the data is “going with” or what the semantics are, but given the site didn’t have a ton of big terms and conditions up front, and so on, it could be anything. Craziness.

    Like

  3. They already sold the site…for $1200. Now I don’t know what of the data is “going with” or what the semantics are, but given the site didn’t have a ton of big terms and conditions up front, and so on, it could be anything. Craziness.

    Like

  4. Design it and sell it in one day, make a profit, rinse and repeat, and let the sucker who buys it deal with the spam lawsuits and legal charges. That’s dirty marketing but it’s done and will be done again. And they will do it as long as they can get people to fall for it.

    Like

  5. Design it and sell it in one day, make a profit, rinse and repeat, and let the sucker who buys it deal with the spam lawsuits and legal charges. That’s dirty marketing but it’s done and will be done again. And they will do it as long as they can get people to fall for it.

    Like

  6. Design it and sell it in one day, make a profit, rinse and repeat, and let the sucker who buys it deal with the spam lawsuits and legal charges. That’s dirty marketing but it’s done and will be done again. And they will do it as long as they can get people to fall for it.

    Like

  7. Whew. Glad I didn’t bother with this one. Site launches and is sold within 24 hours? Shady as all get out. If you signed up you better be changing your password immediately.

    Like

  8. Whew. Glad I didn’t bother with this one. Site launches and is sold within 24 hours? Shady as all get out. If you signed up you better be changing your password immediately.

    Like

  9. Whew. Glad I didn’t bother with this one. Site launches and is sold within 24 hours? Shady as all get out. If you signed up you better be changing your password immediately.

    Like

  10. did not bother with this one cause it had no value for me but many other apps have my Twitter credentials. namely: Twitpic, TweetDeck, BeTweetered, tweethrl, TinyTweeter and possibly others… shall I bother?

    Like

  11. did not bother with this one cause it had no value for me but many other apps have my Twitter credentials. namely: Twitpic, TweetDeck, BeTweetered, tweethrl, TinyTweeter and possibly others… shall I bother?

    Like

  12. did not bother with this one cause it had no value for me but many other apps have my Twitter credentials. namely: Twitpic, TweetDeck, BeTweetered, tweethrl, TinyTweeter and possibly others… shall I bother?

    Like

  13. Did anyone else notice that the site apparently only consisted of the one page? There was no privacy statement. Not even a copyright notice. Too many red flags for me to even bother, but apparently a lot of other folks didn’t mind.

    Like

  14. Did anyone else notice that the site apparently only consisted of the one page? There was no privacy statement. Not even a copyright notice. Too many red flags for me to even bother, but apparently a lot of other folks didn’t mind.

    Like

  15. Did anyone else notice that the site apparently only consisted of the one page? There was no privacy statement. Not even a copyright notice. Too many red flags for me to even bother, but apparently a lot of other folks didn’t mind.

    Like

  16. Change your password, fault fixed. πŸ˜‰

    I have to say, the speed and trust that some people give to these twitter add ons for a little ease is scary. It’s only a day old! Geeze…

    Like

  17. Change your password, fault fixed. πŸ˜‰

    I have to say, the speed and trust that some people give to these twitter add ons for a little ease is scary. It’s only a day old! Geeze…

    Like

  18. Change your password, fault fixed. πŸ˜‰

    I have to say, the speed and trust that some people give to these twitter add ons for a little ease is scary. It’s only a day old! Geeze…

    Like

  19. Change your password, fault fixed. πŸ˜‰

    I have to say, the speed and trust that some people give to these twitter add ons for a little ease is scary. It’s only a day old! Geeze…

    Like

  20. Twitter needs to let third-party applications authenticate you without asking for your password. OAuth solves this problem and it would be great to see Twitter add support for OAuth to their API!

    Like

  21. Twitter needs to let third-party applications authenticate you without asking for your password. OAuth solves this problem and it would be great to see Twitter add support for OAuth to their API!

    Like

  22. Twitter needs to let third-party applications authenticate you without asking for your password. OAuth solves this problem and it would be great to see Twitter add support for OAuth to their API!

    Like

  23. Twitter needs to let third-party applications authenticate you without asking for your password. OAuth solves this problem and it would be great to see Twitter add support for OAuth to their API!

    Like

  24. The creator of the website is far from being a spammer; He’s a startup junkie that has come up with some fantastic ideas ranging from Twitter applications, to various other ends of the spectrum.

    It’s just rabid idiots that run around with their head chopped off that are quick to assume the worst of any website. Get your head out of your ass.

    It was a great idea that was flawed because it missed a few main components (eg: Privacy Policy, Terms of Service, etc.) It does NOT mean that the person who created it was a spammer.

    The individual that created is a young, talented individual. He didn’t have the financial means to continue to support Twply but thought his idea was worth something, and decided to sell it to someone that had the financial capabilities to keep it active.

    Get off your goddamn high-horses.

    Like

  25. The creator of the website is far from being a spammer; He’s a startup junkie that has come up with some fantastic ideas ranging from Twitter applications, to various other ends of the spectrum.

    It’s just rabid idiots that run around with their head chopped off that are quick to assume the worst of any website. Get your head out of your ass.

    It was a great idea that was flawed because it missed a few main components (eg: Privacy Policy, Terms of Service, etc.) It does NOT mean that the person who created it was a spammer.

    The individual that created is a young, talented individual. He didn’t have the financial means to continue to support Twply but thought his idea was worth something, and decided to sell it to someone that had the financial capabilities to keep it active.

    Get off your goddamn high-horses.

    Like

  26. The creator of the website is far from being a spammer; He’s a startup junkie that has come up with some fantastic ideas ranging from Twitter applications, to various other ends of the spectrum.

    It’s just rabid idiots that run around with their head chopped off that are quick to assume the worst of any website. Get your head out of your ass.

    It was a great idea that was flawed because it missed a few main components (eg: Privacy Policy, Terms of Service, etc.) It does NOT mean that the person who created it was a spammer.

    The individual that created is a young, talented individual. He didn’t have the financial means to continue to support Twply but thought his idea was worth something, and decided to sell it to someone that had the financial capabilities to keep it active.

    Get off your goddamn high-horses.

    Like

  27. The creator of the website is far from being a spammer; He’s a startup junkie that has come up with some fantastic ideas ranging from Twitter applications, to various other ends of the spectrum.

    It’s just rabid idiots that run around with their head chopped off that are quick to assume the worst of any website. Get your head out of your ass.

    It was a great idea that was flawed because it missed a few main components (eg: Privacy Policy, Terms of Service, etc.) It does NOT mean that the person who created it was a spammer.

    The individual that created is a young, talented individual. He didn’t have the financial means to continue to support Twply but thought his idea was worth something, and decided to sell it to someone that had the financial capabilities to keep it active.

    Get off your goddamn high-horses.

    Like

  28. The creator of the website is far from being a spammer; He’s a startup junkie that has come up with some fantastic ideas ranging from Twitter applications, to various other ends of the spectrum.

    It’s just rabid idiots that run around with their head chopped off that are quick to assume the worst of any website. Get your head out of your ass.

    It was a great idea that was flawed because it missed a few main components (eg: Privacy Policy, Terms of Service, etc.) It does NOT mean that the person who created it was a spammer.

    The individual that created is a young, talented individual. He didn’t have the financial means to continue to support Twply but thought his idea was worth something, and decided to sell it to someone that had the financial capabilities to keep it active.

    Get off your goddamn high-horses.

    Like

  29. The creator of the website is far from being a spammer; He’s a startup junkie that has come up with some fantastic ideas ranging from Twitter applications, to various other ends of the spectrum.

    It’s just rabid idiots that run around with their head chopped off that are quick to assume the worst of any website. Get your head out of your ass.

    It was a great idea that was flawed because it missed a few main components (eg: Privacy Policy, Terms of Service, etc.) It does NOT mean that the person who created it was a spammer.

    The individual that created is a young, talented individual. He didn’t have the financial means to continue to support Twply but thought his idea was worth something, and decided to sell it to someone that had the financial capabilities to keep it active.

    Get off your goddamn high-horses.

    Like

  30. The creator of the website is far from being a spammer; He’s a startup junkie that has come up with some fantastic ideas ranging from Twitter applications, to various other ends of the spectrum.

    It’s just rabid idiots that run around with their head chopped off that are quick to assume the worst of any website. Get your head out of your ass.

    It was a great idea that was flawed because it missed a few main components (eg: Privacy Policy, Terms of Service, etc.) It does NOT mean that the person who created it was a spammer.

    The individual that created is a young, talented individual. He didn’t have the financial means to continue to support Twply but thought his idea was worth something, and decided to sell it to someone that had the financial capabilities to keep it active.

    Get off your goddamn high-horses.

    Like

  31. The creator of the website is far from being a spammer; He’s a startup junkie that has come up with some fantastic ideas ranging from Twitter applications, to various other ends of the spectrum.

    It’s just rabid idiots that run around with their head chopped off that are quick to assume the worst of any website. Get your head out of your ass.

    It was a great idea that was flawed because it missed a few main components (eg: Privacy Policy, Terms of Service, etc.) It does NOT mean that the person who created it was a spammer.

    The individual that created is a young, talented individual. He didn’t have the financial means to continue to support Twply but thought his idea was worth something, and decided to sell it to someone that had the financial capabilities to keep it active.

    Get off your goddamn high-horses.

    Like

  32. The creator of the website is far from being a spammer; He’s a startup junkie that has come up with some fantastic ideas ranging from Twitter applications, to various other ends of the spectrum.

    It’s just rabid idiots that run around with their head chopped off that are quick to assume the worst of any website. Get your head out of your ass.

    It was a great idea that was flawed because it missed a few main components (eg: Privacy Policy, Terms of Service, etc.) It does NOT mean that the person who created it was a spammer.

    The individual that created is a young, talented individual. He didn’t have the financial means to continue to support Twply but thought his idea was worth something, and decided to sell it to someone that had the financial capabilities to keep it active.

    Get off your goddamn high-horses.

    Like

  33. Horrible but again this is why I don’t put my name and password from twitter into every application that is out there. In fact, I only use name and password for twitter. I don’t use all these applications that everyone swears by. I prefer twitter on my computer and not even on my phone. I don’t even use tweetdeck. Not to sure if I want that distraction despite the fact that I received a Blackberry for Christmas. And, thank you @julie for your observation. Red flag.

    Like

  34. Horrible but again this is why I don’t put my name and password from twitter into every application that is out there. In fact, I only use name and password for twitter. I don’t use all these applications that everyone swears by. I prefer twitter on my computer and not even on my phone. I don’t even use tweetdeck. Not to sure if I want that distraction despite the fact that I received a Blackberry for Christmas. And, thank you @julie for your observation. Red flag.

    Like

  35. Horrible but again this is why I don’t put my name and password from twitter into every application that is out there. In fact, I only use name and password for twitter. I don’t use all these applications that everyone swears by. I prefer twitter on my computer and not even on my phone. I don’t even use tweetdeck. Not to sure if I want that distraction despite the fact that I received a Blackberry for Christmas. And, thank you @julie for your observation. Red flag.

    Like

  36. Horrible but again this is why I don’t put my name and password from twitter into every application that is out there. In fact, I only use name and password for twitter. I don’t use all these applications that everyone swears by. I prefer twitter on my computer and not even on my phone. I don’t even use tweetdeck. Not to sure if I want that distraction despite the fact that I received a Blackberry for Christmas. And, thank you @julie for your observation. Red flag.

    Like

  37. Horrible but again this is why I don’t put my name and password from twitter into every application that is out there. In fact, I only use name and password for twitter. I don’t use all these applications that everyone swears by. I prefer twitter on my computer and not even on my phone. I don’t even use tweetdeck. Not to sure if I want that distraction despite the fact that I received a Blackberry for Christmas. And, thank you @julie for your observation. Red flag.

    Like

  38. Horrible but again this is why I don’t put my name and password from twitter into every application that is out there. In fact, I only use name and password for twitter. I don’t use all these applications that everyone swears by. I prefer twitter on my computer and not even on my phone. I don’t even use tweetdeck. Not to sure if I want that distraction despite the fact that I received a Blackberry for Christmas. And, thank you @julie for your observation. Red flag.

    Like

  39. Horrible but again this is why I don’t put my name and password from twitter into every application that is out there. In fact, I only use name and password for twitter. I don’t use all these applications that everyone swears by. I prefer twitter on my computer and not even on my phone. I don’t even use tweetdeck. Not to sure if I want that distraction despite the fact that I received a Blackberry for Christmas. And, thank you @julie for your observation. Red flag.

    Like

  40. Horrible but again this is why I don’t put my name and password from twitter into every application that is out there. In fact, I only use name and password for twitter. I don’t use all these applications that everyone swears by. I prefer twitter on my computer and not even on my phone. I don’t even use tweetdeck. Not to sure if I want that distraction despite the fact that I received a Blackberry for Christmas. And, thank you @julie for your observation. Red flag.

    Like

  41. Horrible but again this is why I don’t put my name and password from twitter into every application that is out there. In fact, I only use name and password for twitter. I don’t use all these applications that everyone swears by. I prefer twitter on my computer and not even on my phone. I don’t even use tweetdeck. Not to sure if I want that distraction despite the fact that I received a Blackberry for Christmas. And, thank you @julie for your observation. Red flag.

    Like

  42. The whole point of advocating and implementing OAuth on sites like Twitter is to mitigate the obvious security risks of having to give an unknown, untrusted third-party your username and password to some other web site.

    Twitter severely needs to implement some form of authentication, preferably OAuth, since the foundation of twitter is third-party usage. Whether twitter opts to implement OAuth or something as simple as what FriendFeed has done with the “user key” is not as important as them finally implementing such measures.

    Aren’t you on a first name basis with everyone? Can’t you just call your boy Ev and ask him if there are any plans for a third-party authentication scheme for twitter?

    Like

  43. The whole point of advocating and implementing OAuth on sites like Twitter is to mitigate the obvious security risks of having to give an unknown, untrusted third-party your username and password to some other web site.

    Twitter severely needs to implement some form of authentication, preferably OAuth, since the foundation of twitter is third-party usage. Whether twitter opts to implement OAuth or something as simple as what FriendFeed has done with the “user key” is not as important as them finally implementing such measures.

    Aren’t you on a first name basis with everyone? Can’t you just call your boy Ev and ask him if there are any plans for a third-party authentication scheme for twitter?

    Like

  44. The whole point of advocating and implementing OAuth on sites like Twitter is to mitigate the obvious security risks of having to give an unknown, untrusted third-party your username and password to some other web site.

    Twitter severely needs to implement some form of authentication, preferably OAuth, since the foundation of twitter is third-party usage. Whether twitter opts to implement OAuth or something as simple as what FriendFeed has done with the “user key” is not as important as them finally implementing such measures.

    Aren’t you on a first name basis with everyone? Can’t you just call your boy Ev and ask him if there are any plans for a third-party authentication scheme for twitter?

    Like

  45. The whole point of advocating and implementing OAuth on sites like Twitter is to mitigate the obvious security risks of having to give an unknown, untrusted third-party your username and password to some other web site.

    Twitter severely needs to implement some form of authentication, preferably OAuth, since the foundation of twitter is third-party usage. Whether twitter opts to implement OAuth or something as simple as what FriendFeed has done with the “user key” is not as important as them finally implementing such measures.

    Aren’t you on a first name basis with everyone? Can’t you just call your boy Ev and ask him if there are any plans for a third-party authentication scheme for twitter?

    Like

  46. The whole point of advocating and implementing OAuth on sites like Twitter is to mitigate the obvious security risks of having to give an unknown, untrusted third-party your username and password to some other web site.

    Twitter severely needs to implement some form of authentication, preferably OAuth, since the foundation of twitter is third-party usage. Whether twitter opts to implement OAuth or something as simple as what FriendFeed has done with the “user key” is not as important as them finally implementing such measures.

    Aren’t you on a first name basis with everyone? Can’t you just call your boy Ev and ask him if there are any plans for a third-party authentication scheme for twitter?

    Like

  47. The whole point of advocating and implementing OAuth on sites like Twitter is to mitigate the obvious security risks of having to give an unknown, untrusted third-party your username and password to some other web site.

    Twitter severely needs to implement some form of authentication, preferably OAuth, since the foundation of twitter is third-party usage. Whether twitter opts to implement OAuth or something as simple as what FriendFeed has done with the “user key” is not as important as them finally implementing such measures.

    Aren’t you on a first name basis with everyone? Can’t you just call your boy Ev and ask him if there are any plans for a third-party authentication scheme for twitter?

    Like

  48. The whole point of advocating and implementing OAuth on sites like Twitter is to mitigate the obvious security risks of having to give an unknown, untrusted third-party your username and password to some other web site.

    Twitter severely needs to implement some form of authentication, preferably OAuth, since the foundation of twitter is third-party usage. Whether twitter opts to implement OAuth or something as simple as what FriendFeed has done with the “user key” is not as important as them finally implementing such measures.

    Aren’t you on a first name basis with everyone? Can’t you just call your boy Ev and ask him if there are any plans for a third-party authentication scheme for twitter?

    Like

  49. The whole point of advocating and implementing OAuth on sites like Twitter is to mitigate the obvious security risks of having to give an unknown, untrusted third-party your username and password to some other web site.

    Twitter severely needs to implement some form of authentication, preferably OAuth, since the foundation of twitter is third-party usage. Whether twitter opts to implement OAuth or something as simple as what FriendFeed has done with the “user key” is not as important as them finally implementing such measures.

    Aren’t you on a first name basis with everyone? Can’t you just call your boy Ev and ask him if there are any plans for a third-party authentication scheme for twitter?

    Like

  50. The whole point of advocating and implementing OAuth on sites like Twitter is to mitigate the obvious security risks of having to give an unknown, untrusted third-party your username and password to some other web site.

    Twitter severely needs to implement some form of authentication, preferably OAuth, since the foundation of twitter is third-party usage. Whether twitter opts to implement OAuth or something as simple as what FriendFeed has done with the “user key” is not as important as them finally implementing such measures.

    Aren’t you on a first name basis with everyone? Can’t you just call your boy Ev and ask him if there are any plans for a third-party authentication scheme for twitter?

    Like

  51. The site was sold due to our server ability to hand the high load.

    Exactly how has your service been able to clearly demonstrate that it can “hand (sic) the high load?” I find it hard to believe Twply has a really good understanding about what a true high load is. Such a claim seems purely suspect.

    Everyone can say what they want.

    Welcome to the blogosphere, where people can and will say what they want. If you are interested in turning the drama in to good will then you might consider answering some of the many lingering questions:

    1. Why does Twply have no privacy policy posted?
    2. Why does Twply have no terms of service posted?
    3. Why does Twply require Twitter passwords when you can merely convert user RSS feeds and email those. Finding @replies is as easy as using the Twitter API, which does not require a users password for most functionality.
    4. Does Twply store Twitter user passwords unencrypted, encrypted or hashed?

    Until you start answering questions with honest answers, expect the ill-will to continue. My $0.02 anyhow. πŸ™‚

    Like

  52. The site was sold due to our server ability to hand the high load.

    Exactly how has your service been able to clearly demonstrate that it can “hand (sic) the high load?” I find it hard to believe Twply has a really good understanding about what a true high load is. Such a claim seems purely suspect.

    Everyone can say what they want.

    Welcome to the blogosphere, where people can and will say what they want. If you are interested in turning the drama in to good will then you might consider answering some of the many lingering questions:

    1. Why does Twply have no privacy policy posted?
    2. Why does Twply have no terms of service posted?
    3. Why does Twply require Twitter passwords when you can merely convert user RSS feeds and email those. Finding @replies is as easy as using the Twitter API, which does not require a users password for most functionality.
    4. Does Twply store Twitter user passwords unencrypted, encrypted or hashed?

    Until you start answering questions with honest answers, expect the ill-will to continue. My $0.02 anyhow. πŸ™‚

    Like

  53. The site was sold due to our server ability to hand the high load.

    Exactly how has your service been able to clearly demonstrate that it can “hand (sic) the high load?” I find it hard to believe Twply has a really good understanding about what a true high load is. Such a claim seems purely suspect.

    Everyone can say what they want.

    Welcome to the blogosphere, where people can and will say what they want. If you are interested in turning the drama in to good will then you might consider answering some of the many lingering questions:

    1. Why does Twply have no privacy policy posted?
    2. Why does Twply have no terms of service posted?
    3. Why does Twply require Twitter passwords when you can merely convert user RSS feeds and email those. Finding @replies is as easy as using the Twitter API, which does not require a users password for most functionality.
    4. Does Twply store Twitter user passwords unencrypted, encrypted or hashed?

    Until you start answering questions with honest answers, expect the ill-will to continue. My $0.02 anyhow. πŸ™‚

    Like

  54. The site was sold due to our server ability to hand the high load.

    Exactly how has your service been able to clearly demonstrate that it can “hand (sic) the high load?” I find it hard to believe Twply has a really good understanding about what a true high load is. Such a claim seems purely suspect.

    Everyone can say what they want.

    Welcome to the blogosphere, where people can and will say what they want. If you are interested in turning the drama in to good will then you might consider answering some of the many lingering questions:

    1. Why does Twply have no privacy policy posted?
    2. Why does Twply have no terms of service posted?
    3. Why does Twply require Twitter passwords when you can merely convert user RSS feeds and email those. Finding @replies is as easy as using the Twitter API, which does not require a users password for most functionality.
    4. Does Twply store Twitter user passwords unencrypted, encrypted or hashed?

    Until you start answering questions with honest answers, expect the ill-will to continue. My $0.02 anyhow. πŸ™‚

    Like

  55. The site was sold due to our server ability to hand the high load.

    Exactly how has your service been able to clearly demonstrate that it can “hand (sic) the high load?” I find it hard to believe Twply has a really good understanding about what a true high load is. Such a claim seems purely suspect.

    Everyone can say what they want.

    Welcome to the blogosphere, where people can and will say what they want. If you are interested in turning the drama in to good will then you might consider answering some of the many lingering questions:

    1. Why does Twply have no privacy policy posted?
    2. Why does Twply have no terms of service posted?
    3. Why does Twply require Twitter passwords when you can merely convert user RSS feeds and email those. Finding @replies is as easy as using the Twitter API, which does not require a users password for most functionality.
    4. Does Twply store Twitter user passwords unencrypted, encrypted or hashed?

    Until you start answering questions with honest answers, expect the ill-will to continue. My $0.02 anyhow. πŸ™‚

    Like

  56. The site was sold due to our server ability to hand the high load.

    Exactly how has your service been able to clearly demonstrate that it can “hand (sic) the high load?” I find it hard to believe Twply has a really good understanding about what a true high load is. Such a claim seems purely suspect.

    Everyone can say what they want.

    Welcome to the blogosphere, where people can and will say what they want. If you are interested in turning the drama in to good will then you might consider answering some of the many lingering questions:

    1. Why does Twply have no privacy policy posted?
    2. Why does Twply have no terms of service posted?
    3. Why does Twply require Twitter passwords when you can merely convert user RSS feeds and email those. Finding @replies is as easy as using the Twitter API, which does not require a users password for most functionality.
    4. Does Twply store Twitter user passwords unencrypted, encrypted or hashed?

    Until you start answering questions with honest answers, expect the ill-will to continue. My $0.02 anyhow. πŸ™‚

    Like

  57. The site was sold due to our server ability to hand the high load.

    Exactly how has your service been able to clearly demonstrate that it can “hand (sic) the high load?” I find it hard to believe Twply has a really good understanding about what a true high load is. Such a claim seems purely suspect.

    Everyone can say what they want.

    Welcome to the blogosphere, where people can and will say what they want. If you are interested in turning the drama in to good will then you might consider answering some of the many lingering questions:

    1. Why does Twply have no privacy policy posted?
    2. Why does Twply have no terms of service posted?
    3. Why does Twply require Twitter passwords when you can merely convert user RSS feeds and email those. Finding @replies is as easy as using the Twitter API, which does not require a users password for most functionality.
    4. Does Twply store Twitter user passwords unencrypted, encrypted or hashed?

    Until you start answering questions with honest answers, expect the ill-will to continue. My $0.02 anyhow. πŸ™‚

    Like

  58. The site was sold due to our server ability to hand the high load.

    Exactly how has your service been able to clearly demonstrate that it can “hand (sic) the high load?” I find it hard to believe Twply has a really good understanding about what a true high load is. Such a claim seems purely suspect.

    Everyone can say what they want.

    Welcome to the blogosphere, where people can and will say what they want. If you are interested in turning the drama in to good will then you might consider answering some of the many lingering questions:

    1. Why does Twply have no privacy policy posted?
    2. Why does Twply have no terms of service posted?
    3. Why does Twply require Twitter passwords when you can merely convert user RSS feeds and email those. Finding @replies is as easy as using the Twitter API, which does not require a users password for most functionality.
    4. Does Twply store Twitter user passwords unencrypted, encrypted or hashed?

    Until you start answering questions with honest answers, expect the ill-will to continue. My $0.02 anyhow. πŸ™‚

    Like

  59. Can you imagine what people will say when places like ping.fm sell? (or just about any site which offers the ability to crosspost any content to another of your social networks/blogs.etc.)

    All your deets are belong to them.

    Like

  60. Can you imagine what people will say when places like ping.fm sell? (or just about any site which offers the ability to crosspost any content to another of your social networks/blogs.etc.)

    All your deets are belong to them.

    Like

  61. Can you imagine what people will say when places like ping.fm sell? (or just about any site which offers the ability to crosspost any content to another of your social networks/blogs.etc.)

    All your deets are belong to them.

    Like

  62. Can you imagine what people will say when places like ping.fm sell? (or just about any site which offers the ability to crosspost any content to another of your social networks/blogs.etc.)

    All your deets are belong to them.

    Like

  63. Can you imagine what people will say when places like ping.fm sell? (or just about any site which offers the ability to crosspost any content to another of your social networks/blogs.etc.)

    All your deets are belong to them.

    Like

  64. Can you imagine what people will say when places like ping.fm sell? (or just about any site which offers the ability to crosspost any content to another of your social networks/blogs.etc.)

    All your deets are belong to them.

    Like

  65. Can you imagine what people will say when places like ping.fm sell? (or just about any site which offers the ability to crosspost any content to another of your social networks/blogs.etc.)

    All your deets are belong to them.

    Like

  66. This is such a gray area. It’s very interesting for me to hear everyone’s comments, as I have a Twitter app in development called Twitterface that requires at least one account (of Twitter’s) to be entered in order to be able to use it. Additional accounts can be added so that the id/pw is stored for ease-of-use (since my application is specifically geared toward multi-accounts.)

    It is not yet released, and I have no plans to sell it once it is, but hypothetically, were I to sell it someday, it would most definitely include users names/passwords because that is what the site DOES (lets you access Twitter in a different way.)

    For those of us that make Twitter apps to utilize it plus combination with our own creativity, there is no other way (I don’t think) to do some of these things without requiring the id/pw. Apps like @mrtweet are able to look at public info and use an algorithm to give neat results. But if you are using an alternate client, such as Tweetdeck, Twitterific or my soon-to-launch Twitterface, there’s no other way at this time to do it.

    Given that, rather than throw the baby out with the bathwater, I think people should follow app creators on Twitter, look up reviews, and do as much due diligence as needed to feel comfortable before giving out your Twitter account info. I was already planning on privacy policy, etc. but I think some additional things are in order as well, based on this feedback, and I am going to be thinking about everyone’s concerns here a lot.

    I do not know the Twply creators, but I do have a lot of experience working with startups, and the simple fact is, many cool things can be created by people who don’t have all the information they need about launching a product. Therefore you might not see privacy policies, etc. It does not indicate bad intentions necessarily for these things to be missing – it may have been out of a lack of experience in doing something like this. Not sure.

    Like

  67. This is such a gray area. It’s very interesting for me to hear everyone’s comments, as I have a Twitter app in development called Twitterface that requires at least one account (of Twitter’s) to be entered in order to be able to use it. Additional accounts can be added so that the id/pw is stored for ease-of-use (since my application is specifically geared toward multi-accounts.)

    It is not yet released, and I have no plans to sell it once it is, but hypothetically, were I to sell it someday, it would most definitely include users names/passwords because that is what the site DOES (lets you access Twitter in a different way.)

    For those of us that make Twitter apps to utilize it plus combination with our own creativity, there is no other way (I don’t think) to do some of these things without requiring the id/pw. Apps like @mrtweet are able to look at public info and use an algorithm to give neat results. But if you are using an alternate client, such as Tweetdeck, Twitterific or my soon-to-launch Twitterface, there’s no other way at this time to do it.

    Given that, rather than throw the baby out with the bathwater, I think people should follow app creators on Twitter, look up reviews, and do as much due diligence as needed to feel comfortable before giving out your Twitter account info. I was already planning on privacy policy, etc. but I think some additional things are in order as well, based on this feedback, and I am going to be thinking about everyone’s concerns here a lot.

    I do not know the Twply creators, but I do have a lot of experience working with startups, and the simple fact is, many cool things can be created by people who don’t have all the information they need about launching a product. Therefore you might not see privacy policies, etc. It does not indicate bad intentions necessarily for these things to be missing – it may have been out of a lack of experience in doing something like this. Not sure.

    Like

  68. This is such a gray area. It’s very interesting for me to hear everyone’s comments, as I have a Twitter app in development called Twitterface that requires at least one account (of Twitter’s) to be entered in order to be able to use it. Additional accounts can be added so that the id/pw is stored for ease-of-use (since my application is specifically geared toward multi-accounts.)

    It is not yet released, and I have no plans to sell it once it is, but hypothetically, were I to sell it someday, it would most definitely include users names/passwords because that is what the site DOES (lets you access Twitter in a different way.)

    For those of us that make Twitter apps to utilize it plus combination with our own creativity, there is no other way (I don’t think) to do some of these things without requiring the id/pw. Apps like @mrtweet are able to look at public info and use an algorithm to give neat results. But if you are using an alternate client, such as Tweetdeck, Twitterific or my soon-to-launch Twitterface, there’s no other way at this time to do it.

    Given that, rather than throw the baby out with the bathwater, I think people should follow app creators on Twitter, look up reviews, and do as much due diligence as needed to feel comfortable before giving out your Twitter account info. I was already planning on privacy policy, etc. but I think some additional things are in order as well, based on this feedback, and I am going to be thinking about everyone’s concerns here a lot.

    I do not know the Twply creators, but I do have a lot of experience working with startups, and the simple fact is, many cool things can be created by people who don’t have all the information they need about launching a product. Therefore you might not see privacy policies, etc. It does not indicate bad intentions necessarily for these things to be missing – it may have been out of a lack of experience in doing something like this. Not sure.

    Like

  69. OAuth twitter authentication could also be implemented by a trusted 3rd party. Someone we could trust with our username/password and would act as a proxy of twitter API. I guess many users would even pay for this service.

    Applications would then have to use OAuth and a different API endpoint to access the twitter API, but the rest could stay the same.

    Like

  70. OAuth twitter authentication could also be implemented by a trusted 3rd party. Someone we could trust with our username/password and would act as a proxy of twitter API. I guess many users would even pay for this service.

    Applications would then have to use OAuth and a different API endpoint to access the twitter API, but the rest could stay the same.

    Like

  71. OAuth twitter authentication could also be implemented by a trusted 3rd party. Someone we could trust with our username/password and would act as a proxy of twitter API. I guess many users would even pay for this service.

    Applications would then have to use OAuth and a different API endpoint to access the twitter API, but the rest could stay the same.

    Like

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