Did Microsoft blogger pull a post down? If so, why?

On my Link Blog there’s a post by Loke Uei about Silverlight (Microsoft’s new Media Platform) comparing it to other platforms. The post is in Google Reader, but has been removed from his blog (I’m in the middle of a link blog posting frenzy, so the post in question has already moved to the second page).

That behavior always gets me to focus in on what got removed.

Loke: I’d recommend putting the post back up or, at minimum, put up a new post on the same URL that explains that the first post was removed.

Remember, once something gets posted on the Internet is CAN NOT be removed.

38 thoughts on “Did Microsoft blogger pull a post down? If so, why?

  1. You know why these things happen, i’m sure you’ve seen a ton of this and not to mention having to experience some of this yourself. thanks for policing us 😉

    Blog post is up again if it makes a difference. Many others have already blogged about it, despite the blogging guidelines.

    Just don’t understand why we have to hold on to news when others in the community and media already have talked about it, case in point. Windows Mobile 6 news. I remember, I can’t even ACKNOWLEDGE it’s existence a day before launch when every gadget site had images and videos.

    guess something has to change 🙂 Perhaps you can recommend a PR strategy that is blog friendly and yet maintain the element of secrecy & surprise.

    Like

  2. You know why these things happen, i’m sure you’ve seen a ton of this and not to mention having to experience some of this yourself. thanks for policing us 😉

    Blog post is up again if it makes a difference. Many others have already blogged about it, despite the blogging guidelines.

    Just don’t understand why we have to hold on to news when others in the community and media already have talked about it, case in point. Windows Mobile 6 news. I remember, I can’t even ACKNOWLEDGE it’s existence a day before launch when every gadget site had images and videos.

    guess something has to change 🙂 Perhaps you can recommend a PR strategy that is blog friendly and yet maintain the element of secrecy & surprise.

    Like

  3. Loke: ahhhh, someone was mad that you went out before a set time? I hate that.

    Edward: the thing is your content rarely is really removed from the Internet. Pulling it down is OK, but I’d rather you just leave the page up with a nice message saying “I pulled this content down.” Or something like that. Again, transparency works better than just silence.

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  4. Loke: ahhhh, someone was mad that you went out before a set time? I hate that.

    Edward: the thing is your content rarely is really removed from the Internet. Pulling it down is OK, but I’d rather you just leave the page up with a nice message saying “I pulled this content down.” Or something like that. Again, transparency works better than just silence.

    Like

  5. “Just don’t understand why we have to hold on to news when others in the community and media already have talked about it, case in point. Windows Mobile 6 news. I remember, I can’t even ACKNOWLEDGE it’s existence a day before launch when every gadget site had images and videos.”

    Loke, maybe one way to think of it is that rumor sites carry rumors, without info which readers can verify. But once the company actually does announce something, then it’s actually in the verifiable public realm, and becomes a legitimate target of conversation.

    (The risk is that *you* would become the story… as a staffer, your post would be seen as having more legitimacy than the rumors others post… you’re in a different situation than unaffiliated others.)

    jd/adobe

    Like

  6. “Just don’t understand why we have to hold on to news when others in the community and media already have talked about it, case in point. Windows Mobile 6 news. I remember, I can’t even ACKNOWLEDGE it’s existence a day before launch when every gadget site had images and videos.”

    Loke, maybe one way to think of it is that rumor sites carry rumors, without info which readers can verify. But once the company actually does announce something, then it’s actually in the verifiable public realm, and becomes a legitimate target of conversation.

    (The risk is that *you* would become the story… as a staffer, your post would be seen as having more legitimacy than the rumors others post… you’re in a different situation than unaffiliated others.)

    jd/adobe

    Like

  7. “Remember, once something gets posted on the Internet is CAN NOT be removed.”

    That’s not really true. If archive.org didn’t get it and nobody cares to cache or mirror it, it can effectively be removed.

    Our main computer is in our offices. It doesn’t get hit very often by spiders. If I post something, I can effectively remove it without it ever being a problem.

    NO ROBOT, not even google’s sweeps the entire internet on 15 minute intervals.

    Unless a LOT of people care, you can safely remove whatever it was that you had up. Archive.org’s spider is extremely unreliable. Even the Google cache gets updated regularly.

    Like

  8. “Remember, once something gets posted on the Internet is CAN NOT be removed.”

    That’s not really true. If archive.org didn’t get it and nobody cares to cache or mirror it, it can effectively be removed.

    Our main computer is in our offices. It doesn’t get hit very often by spiders. If I post something, I can effectively remove it without it ever being a problem.

    NO ROBOT, not even google’s sweeps the entire internet on 15 minute intervals.

    Unless a LOT of people care, you can safely remove whatever it was that you had up. Archive.org’s spider is extremely unreliable. Even the Google cache gets updated regularly.

    Like

  9. Here’s my official position on content management: When someone else decides to pay for my web hosting fees, that person/people can dictate my content management decisions.

    And uh, excuse me? Can not be removed? This is hardly stone tablet and chisel territory.

    Like

  10. Here’s my official position on content management: When someone else decides to pay for my web hosting fees, that person/people can dictate my content management decisions.

    And uh, excuse me? Can not be removed? This is hardly stone tablet and chisel territory.

    Like

  11. Scoble, you seem to act like bloggers have some journalistic integrity they need to maintain. A blog is just a random person yapping on the internet, they can do whatever they like with their content. It’s not like the New York Times or like anyone out there has a journalism degree, complete with the ethics that demands.

    Oddly, it seems like you’ve fallen into the classic trap of, “If it’s on the Internet it must be true.’ You seem to believe that a) anything anyone puts up is of worth something, b) that it’s now under some grand journalistic policy.

    Sure, it’s in the great cache but so what? It’s everyone’s right to yank content if they want, for any reason, good or otherwise.

    Like

  12. Scoble, you seem to act like bloggers have some journalistic integrity they need to maintain. A blog is just a random person yapping on the internet, they can do whatever they like with their content. It’s not like the New York Times or like anyone out there has a journalism degree, complete with the ethics that demands.

    Oddly, it seems like you’ve fallen into the classic trap of, “If it’s on the Internet it must be true.’ You seem to believe that a) anything anyone puts up is of worth something, b) that it’s now under some grand journalistic policy.

    Sure, it’s in the great cache but so what? It’s everyone’s right to yank content if they want, for any reason, good or otherwise.

    Like

  13. We’re just seeing a general shift in public acceptance/interest to “preliminary news.” Preliminary news is fragmented, revised, annotated, debated, destroyed, rebuilt, etc.

    Blog readers have an inexplicable hunger to ascertain facts and opinions *as they are being formed* It’s an obsession with non-facts, or pre-facts, or meta-facts… or pre-meta-non-facts.

    “If I read this blog that commented on a user comment on that blog, which talks about issues which surround a post on another blog, then perhaps I’ll learn more about x”

    Yes, when someone finally writes a blogger manifesto that takes into account pre-facts, and the proper dissemination of preliminary unconfirmed information and innuendo, *THEN* we can tackle this issue of people pulling blog posts …and other black holes of the internet.

    Because one day later is just not good enough!! Take that, NYT 😉

    Like

  14. We’re just seeing a general shift in public acceptance/interest to “preliminary news.” Preliminary news is fragmented, revised, annotated, debated, destroyed, rebuilt, etc.

    Blog readers have an inexplicable hunger to ascertain facts and opinions *as they are being formed* It’s an obsession with non-facts, or pre-facts, or meta-facts… or pre-meta-non-facts.

    “If I read this blog that commented on a user comment on that blog, which talks about issues which surround a post on another blog, then perhaps I’ll learn more about x”

    Yes, when someone finally writes a blogger manifesto that takes into account pre-facts, and the proper dissemination of preliminary unconfirmed information and innuendo, *THEN* we can tackle this issue of people pulling blog posts …and other black holes of the internet.

    Because one day later is just not good enough!! Take that, NYT 😉

    Like

  15. I did this once and it freaked everyone out, so much so it became a ZDNet article.

    I think people are wanting to see a story how execs in Microsoft demand a blog post being pulled down and the conspiracy theory flows. Yet, like me Loke just didn’t feel right about the post (bah, maybe its noise vs what I usually do) that sort of thing may of rolled around his head.

    Amazing how Blogs have changed from their initial creation back in the day – so many unwritten rules.


    Scott Barnes
    Developer Evangelist
    Microsoft.

    Like

  16. I did this once and it freaked everyone out, so much so it became a ZDNet article.

    I think people are wanting to see a story how execs in Microsoft demand a blog post being pulled down and the conspiracy theory flows. Yet, like me Loke just didn’t feel right about the post (bah, maybe its noise vs what I usually do) that sort of thing may of rolled around his head.

    Amazing how Blogs have changed from their initial creation back in the day – so many unwritten rules.


    Scott Barnes
    Developer Evangelist
    Microsoft.

    Like

  17. @13. Scott, let’s not forget: Scoble supposedly wrote a book about blogging. It’s supposedly the definitive tome on how blogging should be done. If you don’t follow the rules outlined in Scoble’s book, then the Blogofacists will hunt you down.

    Like

  18. @13. Scott, let’s not forget: Scoble supposedly wrote a book about blogging. It’s supposedly the definitive tome on how blogging should be done. If you don’t follow the rules outlined in Scoble’s book, then the Blogofacists will hunt you down.

    Like

  19. I think one of the geniuses of the Internet is that stuff can be removed and edited. Most of the time I don’t like it when it’s something I want to know about, but I firmly believe in the content owner being the content owner (period).

    I’ve often encountered people who used their blogs in different ways than I would and in different ways than I think they should. Oh well.

    BTW, feel free to delete this comment if you don’t like it. It’s your blog and you can do whatever you want. 😀

    Like

  20. I think one of the geniuses of the Internet is that stuff can be removed and edited. Most of the time I don’t like it when it’s something I want to know about, but I firmly believe in the content owner being the content owner (period).

    I’ve often encountered people who used their blogs in different ways than I would and in different ways than I think they should. Oh well.

    BTW, feel free to delete this comment if you don’t like it. It’s your blog and you can do whatever you want. 😀

    Like

  21. I think the thing about the internet is that the thing you don’t want people know is always the thing that people want to know, so once that thing is up there, well you’re screwed.

    If you’re the kind of person that cares about not having certain things out there, but why care?

    I think the American culture is changing. The whole voyeuristic thing. I think even when people get caught, whether it be an odd email or odd pictures, they sort of don’t care. They have to act like they care, but they don’t, not really. So many people have made so many mistakes, it almost seems mute now…

    Kind of like the first president that admitted drug use. It was like, “Whoa!!!” You know, because the President of the US did drugs, but as time goes by you realize…if we exclude everyone who has ever done drugs, well anyone who graduated from college after 1965 will never be able to be president. Not that everyone does drugs, but the kind of person that ends up being president (please like me, i’m so cool, i’m an every person, person), well usually that kind of a person has done some kind of drug.

    Ok this was such a non-techy response, but I want to play too.

    🙂

    Lo

    Like

  22. I think the thing about the internet is that the thing you don’t want people know is always the thing that people want to know, so once that thing is up there, well you’re screwed.

    If you’re the kind of person that cares about not having certain things out there, but why care?

    I think the American culture is changing. The whole voyeuristic thing. I think even when people get caught, whether it be an odd email or odd pictures, they sort of don’t care. They have to act like they care, but they don’t, not really. So many people have made so many mistakes, it almost seems mute now…

    Kind of like the first president that admitted drug use. It was like, “Whoa!!!” You know, because the President of the US did drugs, but as time goes by you realize…if we exclude everyone who has ever done drugs, well anyone who graduated from college after 1965 will never be able to be president. Not that everyone does drugs, but the kind of person that ends up being president (please like me, i’m so cool, i’m an every person, person), well usually that kind of a person has done some kind of drug.

    Ok this was such a non-techy response, but I want to play too.

    🙂

    Lo

    Like

  23. That is why you need TClipper to snap web content for later reference. Because web is so dynamic and content provider or regulator will withdraw the content for varies reasons.
    Have you checked all your bookmarks are available? There must be some dead links there. So, for important stuff, save a copy for yourself. Sometime do a little bit more can save your tone’s time to fumble the search engine’s database. Always, the missing piece is important to let you regret you haven’t saved it before. TClipper can definitely help you beyond your expectation.

    Like

  24. That is why you need TClipper to snap web content for later reference. Because web is so dynamic and content provider or regulator will withdraw the content for varies reasons.
    Have you checked all your bookmarks are available? There must be some dead links there. So, for important stuff, save a copy for yourself. Sometime do a little bit more can save your tone’s time to fumble the search engine’s database. Always, the missing piece is important to let you regret you haven’t saved it before. TClipper can definitely help you beyond your expectation.

    Like

  25. “Remember, once something gets posted on the Internet is CAN NOT be removed.”

    i’m gonna be chuckling all day about this one!
    perhaps that means the content has been >

    Like

  26. “Remember, once something gets posted on the Internet is CAN NOT be removed.”

    i’m gonna be chuckling all day about this one!
    perhaps that means the content has been >

    Like

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