The Intel video I should have linked to more prominently

In all the excitement of MY videos not getting linked to enough, I made the mistake of not more prominently sharing a much better video that PodTech produced with Intel. This one doesn’t have my annoying laugh, my shaky camera work, had a full crew (two camera people, an audio person, a production person, and “real talent.” To you, that’s Jason Lopez, who used to work at NPR and has forgotten a lot more about media production than I’ll ever know). Oh, and it was edited down to “YouTube length” (Less than nine minutes). Has music. Professional titles. And all that, so it’s definitely NOT boring.

If you hate my videos, you’ll love this one.

[podtech content=http://media.podtech.net/media/2007/01/PID_001917/Podtech_Intel45nM_revised.flv&postURL=http://www.podtech.net/home/technology/1971/intel-says-45-nanometer-microprocessors-due-later-this-year&totalTime=520000&breadcrumb=3F34K2L1]

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35 thoughts on “The Intel video I should have linked to more prominently

  1. Personally I enjoyed the more “conversational” videos you did to this one – it felt too “advertising” like, too polished.

    Plus, you know, you didn’t laugh that much in your two…

    Like

  2. Personally I enjoyed the more “conversational” videos you did to this one – it felt too “advertising” like, too polished.

    Plus, you know, you didn’t laugh that much in your two…

    Like

  3. I watched both. To be honest, I found yours interesting but I’ve had semiconductor clients, been bunny suited and in fabs art directing shoots so have probably a deeper interest so the length didn’t bother me (and you didn’t laugh too much 😉 ). But, this one told me everything about the tech and why it is important and is much more concise and clear. This is the one I’d link to for most purposes. This is a video news release.
    With other videos, I’d link to you.

    Like

  4. I watched both. To be honest, I found yours interesting but I’ve had semiconductor clients, been bunny suited and in fabs art directing shoots so have probably a deeper interest so the length didn’t bother me (and you didn’t laugh too much 😉 ). But, this one told me everything about the tech and why it is important and is much more concise and clear. This is the one I’d link to for most purposes. This is a video news release.
    With other videos, I’d link to you.

    Like

  5. Very nicely done PR piece — you should have disclosed that PodTech was being paid to do it when you posted the ScobleShow.

    Since you’re the only tech blogger who got access to this scoop before everyone else, is it safe to assume that your access was granted because of PodTech’s paid relationship with Intel?

    Like

  6. Very nicely done PR piece — you should have disclosed that PodTech was being paid to do it when you posted the ScobleShow.

    Since you’re the only tech blogger who got access to this scoop before everyone else, is it safe to assume that your access was granted because of PodTech’s paid relationship with Intel?

    Like

  7. Scoble your videos are terrible. The editing looks like ass. Hire someone already will you? You whore yourself out for a failing dotcom2pointOH. You accuse Gizmodo and Engadget of link fraud because they don’t care about your videos.

    Earth to Scoble.

    Is PodTech on the death watch list on Valleywag yet?? WTF is a PodTech?

    Like

  8. Scoble your videos are terrible. The editing looks like ass. Hire someone already will you? You whore yourself out for a failing dotcom2pointOH. You accuse Gizmodo and Engadget of link fraud because they don’t care about your videos.

    Earth to Scoble.

    Is PodTech on the death watch list on Valleywag yet?? WTF is a PodTech?

    Like

  9. Aaron: I don’t know. I heard I was invited because I do a famous video blog.

    But, we don’t hide our corporate clients and I’m up front and honest if you ask about them.

    Like

  10. KayZ: our company started out as a podcasting company podcasting the tech industry. So, that’s where “PodTech” came from.

    The editing looks like ass? Maybe that’s because I don’t edit at all!

    Like

  11. KayZ: our company started out as a podcasting company podcasting the tech industry. So, that’s where “PodTech” came from.

    The editing looks like ass? Maybe that’s because I don’t edit at all!

    Like

  12. Robert: we’re supposed to ask after every video you post if your company is also producing PR content for them?

    Isn’t easier and more ethically sound to just say so up front?

    Like

  13. Robert: we’re supposed to ask after every video you post if your company is also producing PR content for them?

    Isn’t easier and more ethically sound to just say so up front?

    Like

  14. Speaking of linking – I was over at PodTech the other day and having a look at some of the channels (categories) and found it surprising that when I click on Seagate, for example, there was not an obvious link to Seagate’s website, although obviously the links in the articles often link to their website, but this is not the same as it is not as consistent click through. I went to Google to check the web page instead. I assume those guys pay for their category, so perhaps I’m just missing something? Thought if it’s not just my being asleep that you would value the constructive comment.

    Like

  15. Speaking of linking – I was over at PodTech the other day and having a look at some of the channels (categories) and found it surprising that when I click on Seagate, for example, there was not an obvious link to Seagate’s website, although obviously the links in the articles often link to their website, but this is not the same as it is not as consistent click through. I went to Google to check the web page instead. I assume those guys pay for their category, so perhaps I’m just missing something? Thought if it’s not just my being asleep that you would value the constructive comment.

    Like

  16. There *was* something of the corporate video about it, which isn’t bad, necessarily.

    The opening captions were OK, but could have been done better: show the quote, then the quotees (?) then the date but all together, so us goldfish attention span sufferers can keep track…

    I was going to rant about the use of “anymore” but then I discovered that it *is* a word in American. [sigh]

    Like

  17. There *was* something of the corporate video about it, which isn’t bad, necessarily.

    The opening captions were OK, but could have been done better: show the quote, then the quotees (?) then the date but all together, so us goldfish attention span sufferers can keep track…

    I was going to rant about the use of “anymore” but then I discovered that it *is* a word in American. [sigh]

    Like

  18. It is tricky, isn’t it! I agree this feels too polished and TV-like, but of course it’s nicely done and will appeal to many.

    The HUGE advantage of videoblogging – and blogging – is the real, authentic voice of one person. We are living in the age of authenticity. That’s why an authentic voice, such as yours, stands out and people think, “This is what I’m not getting from my media diet.” We are bombarded with heavily produced media, and we can’t tell one channel from the next.

    So please, keep producing your unedited videos. It’s hugely valuable to a niche audience at the very least. My only thought is it might be a good idea to have a “best of” – something still original and Scoble-y but, more edited and accessible to a broader audience not willing to commit to a long sit-down interview.

    There is no easy answer. I struggled with this editing Amanda Across America, and we ended up going with those long interviews much of the time because there was so much good information. Many people didn’t have patience for them, but those that did were grateful for respecting the topic enough to explore in-depth.

    Let’s keep experimenting and see what works. 🙂

    Like

  19. It is tricky, isn’t it! I agree this feels too polished and TV-like, but of course it’s nicely done and will appeal to many.

    The HUGE advantage of videoblogging – and blogging – is the real, authentic voice of one person. We are living in the age of authenticity. That’s why an authentic voice, such as yours, stands out and people think, “This is what I’m not getting from my media diet.” We are bombarded with heavily produced media, and we can’t tell one channel from the next.

    So please, keep producing your unedited videos. It’s hugely valuable to a niche audience at the very least. My only thought is it might be a good idea to have a “best of” – something still original and Scoble-y but, more edited and accessible to a broader audience not willing to commit to a long sit-down interview.

    There is no easy answer. I struggled with this editing Amanda Across America, and we ended up going with those long interviews much of the time because there was so much good information. Many people didn’t have patience for them, but those that did were grateful for respecting the topic enough to explore in-depth.

    Let’s keep experimenting and see what works. 🙂

    Like

  20. This is a hard game to win. Too slick and ourmarketing-rejection filters come on line. Too raw and it’s a slog to get through it.

    Didn’t Goldilocks prefer Mama Bear’s porridge? Didn’t Aristotle advise us to seek the Golden Mean between the two excesses?

    IMHO, the interview with Mark Bohr, like most of your interviews, was excellent raw material for a more coherent, concise piece of story-telling. I love that you keep asking your subjects to translate technobabble to plain English. I love that you ask basic as well as advanced questions. I love that you bring so much joy, openness, curiosity, and enthusiasm to the game.

    I feel burned, however, by your marketing hype: “a very rare look inside Intel’s newest fab …” was an overpromise in the style of a National Enquirer headline. Reality: you took us down a long corridor and into a changing room. Then back out to the corridor. Could have done delivered the same thrills at any fab at any time in the last decade. OK.. We got a couple of quick glimpses of the fab through a window but you didn’t (couldn’t) show us any of the process. I would have received 95% of the value with an audio-podcast.

    Like

  21. This is a hard game to win. Too slick and ourmarketing-rejection filters come on line. Too raw and it’s a slog to get through it.

    Didn’t Goldilocks prefer Mama Bear’s porridge? Didn’t Aristotle advise us to seek the Golden Mean between the two excesses?

    IMHO, the interview with Mark Bohr, like most of your interviews, was excellent raw material for a more coherent, concise piece of story-telling. I love that you keep asking your subjects to translate technobabble to plain English. I love that you ask basic as well as advanced questions. I love that you bring so much joy, openness, curiosity, and enthusiasm to the game.

    I feel burned, however, by your marketing hype: “a very rare look inside Intel’s newest fab …” was an overpromise in the style of a National Enquirer headline. Reality: you took us down a long corridor and into a changing room. Then back out to the corridor. Could have done delivered the same thrills at any fab at any time in the last decade. OK.. We got a couple of quick glimpses of the fab through a window but you didn’t (couldn’t) show us any of the process. I would have received 95% of the value with an audio-podcast.

    Like

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