Firefox 2 rocks (it’s way faster)

I’m boring, but Firefox 2 Release Candidate 2, released yesterday, isn’t (TechMeme has the details). It’s way faster and I like its UI a lot better too (it has the improved tabs that IE 7 has, where the close box is on the tab itself, much nicer).

But, really, this sucker is just faster everywhere I poke. Very nice.

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82 thoughts on “Firefox 2 rocks (it’s way faster)

  1. Auto-session recovery after a crash is the best feature of this release for me.

    The inline spell checker is good too.

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  2. Auto-session recovery after a crash is the best feature of this release for me.

    The inline spell checker is good too.

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  3. I installed it this morning and went back to 1.5 10 minutes later. There still is no single window mode (open links that request being opened in new windows in tabs, not new windows), it still can not restore my tabs after I closed Firefox. And even worse: The extension I us in 1.5 to do this (Tab Mix Plus) doesn’t work on 2.0. There is a dev build that’s supposed to work, but it doesn’t.

    Plus: The new theme is ugly. 😉

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  4. I installed it this morning and went back to 1.5 10 minutes later. There still is no single window mode (open links that request being opened in new windows in tabs, not new windows), it still can not restore my tabs after I closed Firefox. And even worse: The extension I us in 1.5 to do this (Tab Mix Plus) doesn’t work on 2.0. There is a dev build that’s supposed to work, but it doesn’t.

    Plus: The new theme is ugly. 😉

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  5. “(it has the improved tabs that IE 7 has, where the close box is on the tab itself, much nicer).”

    So FireFox 2 has the improved tabs with the close box on the tab itself, which IE7 already has, which Safari had before IE 7? 😉

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  6. “(it has the improved tabs that IE 7 has, where the close box is on the tab itself, much nicer).”

    So FireFox 2 has the improved tabs with the close box on the tab itself, which IE7 already has, which Safari had before IE 7? 😉

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  7. Close box on tab is not so good as you think.

    Then you finished reading page – now instead of clicking on X in always predictable location – you have to search for active tab and move your mouse there.

    As well – if you have too many tabs open – you will see X near old place there you used to click on it. So it’s become possible to close wrong tab.

    I understand that my opinion is personal and some other users will like it better – as it give options to close windows without activating them first.
    But I wish we had an option to get close box in old location.

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  8. Close box on tab is not so good as you think.

    Then you finished reading page – now instead of clicking on X in always predictable location – you have to search for active tab and move your mouse there.

    As well – if you have too many tabs open – you will see X near old place there you used to click on it. So it’s become possible to close wrong tab.

    I understand that my opinion is personal and some other users will like it better – as it give options to close windows without activating them first.
    But I wish we had an option to get close box in old location.

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  9. TAG – I agree with you there. I haven’t used it yet but that is one feature that I would have liked to have stayed the same.

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  10. TAG – I agree with you there. I haven’t used it yet but that is one feature that I would have liked to have stayed the same.

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  11. “Middle-click” has always closed tabs. There is no need for the close icon. Middle click on a link opens the url in a new tabs. I imagine must people don’t realize the power of the “middle click”. And if you using an old Mac mouse you never will.

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  12. “Middle-click” has always closed tabs. There is no need for the close icon. Middle click on a link opens the url in a new tabs. I imagine must people don’t realize the power of the “middle click”. And if you using an old Mac mouse you never will.

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  13. Does everyone forget Opera? They were the instigators of tabbed browsing many halfmoons ago and have always had X close on each tab 🙂

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  14. Does everyone forget Opera? They were the instigators of tabbed browsing many halfmoons ago and have always had X close on each tab 🙂

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  15. You mean the close buttons copied from Safari, right? ctrl-w is so much more convenient, and I don’t accidentally close the tab I want when I click too close to the X on the tab. I’m trying to figure out how any of this is real news or worth anybody’s time.

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  16. You mean the close buttons copied from Safari, right? ctrl-w is so much more convenient, and I don’t accidentally close the tab I want when I click too close to the X on the tab. I’m trying to figure out how any of this is real news or worth anybody’s time.

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  17. RC1 had the close button on the tab, didn’t it? Seems like i’ve been browsing that way (sans any spiffy extensions to do such behavior) for weeks now, eh? (this one looks prettier though)

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  18. RC1 had the close button on the tab, didn’t it? Seems like i’ve been browsing that way (sans any spiffy extensions to do such behavior) for weeks now, eh? (this one looks prettier though)

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  19. Firefox is just now catching up to where Opera has already been for quit a while – Ooh, a close box on the tab itself – how innovative. And quick? Gimme a break.

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  20. Firefox is just now catching up to where Opera has already been for quit a while – Ooh, a close box on the tab itself – how innovative. And quick? Gimme a break.

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  21. @phrostypoison
    Hm, then my imported profile must have killed that. For me it opened lots of new windows. Still the restore feature is missing which I use a lot.

    @Matti
    No, I haven’t tried that, but I don’t think it would help in this case. The dev build I used for Tab Mix Plus did work in the sense of it got activated, and some of the settings actually worked. But just some, e.g. the single window setting did not. So it seems to be more of a problem of how 2.0 opens windows which is different from how 1.5 did it.

    @Will
    If you just need the features that Opera provides I don’t see a reason not to use it and switch to Firefox. I switched to Firefox because Opera was missing features (most prominently ad blocking) and does not even have the concept of extensions. Whatever you like about Opera featurewise, there is definetly an extension for Firefox providing the exact same feature in a gazillion different ways so that everybody gets what he wants. And speed is not an issue for me, I have not yet encountered a browser which felt slow. There may be objetcivly fast or slow browsers, but as long as I don’t notice it I don’t care.

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  22. @phrostypoison
    Hm, then my imported profile must have killed that. For me it opened lots of new windows. Still the restore feature is missing which I use a lot.

    @Matti
    No, I haven’t tried that, but I don’t think it would help in this case. The dev build I used for Tab Mix Plus did work in the sense of it got activated, and some of the settings actually worked. But just some, e.g. the single window setting did not. So it seems to be more of a problem of how 2.0 opens windows which is different from how 1.5 did it.

    @Will
    If you just need the features that Opera provides I don’t see a reason not to use it and switch to Firefox. I switched to Firefox because Opera was missing features (most prominently ad blocking) and does not even have the concept of extensions. Whatever you like about Opera featurewise, there is definetly an extension for Firefox providing the exact same feature in a gazillion different ways so that everybody gets what he wants. And speed is not an issue for me, I have not yet encountered a browser which felt slow. There may be objetcivly fast or slow browsers, but as long as I don’t notice it I don’t care.

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  23. Faster, yes, but then Opera’s been miles down the road eons ago, but then I can’t live without some FF extensions, so mull between Opera and FF. But IE is a long long distant memory and use Avant for those times when IE proves a neccessary evil.

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  24. Faster, yes, but then Opera’s been miles down the road eons ago, but then I can’t live without some FF extensions, so mull between Opera and FF. But IE is a long long distant memory and use Avant for those times when IE proves a neccessary evil.

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  25. The new default skin is just ugly.
    Rss feeds dont’t look as good as in IE7.
    Visual rendering of pages is not as smooth as in IE7.

    Anyway, i use FF2(RC2) because it is THE browser.

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  26. The new default skin is just ugly.
    Rss feeds dont’t look as good as in IE7.
    Visual rendering of pages is not as smooth as in IE7.

    Anyway, i use FF2(RC2) because it is THE browser.

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  27. @diego,

    Yes IE7 and Safari had those style of tabs first, but no one is saying anything towards them. No one is saying who was first. Besides I think Opera was the first, and props to them for that.

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  28. @diego,

    Yes IE7 and Safari had those style of tabs first, but no one is saying anything towards them. No one is saying who was first. Besides I think Opera was the first, and props to them for that.

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  29. There might have been other browser before with close buttons on tabs, but Safari introduced them in its version 1.x. Opera added them in Opera 8 (with the option to revert to the real MDI buttons like it always had had). The Firefox team is the only one that did some serious usability research some time ago, and the change in Firefox 2 is the result of this research.

    Saved sessions (autorestore after crash, or always if you want) have been with Opera since Opera 4 or 5. Omniweb on Mac also has extensive session features. Firefox 2 is now getting some – and IE7 doesn’t have them, nor Safari, IIANM.

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  30. There might have been other browser before with close buttons on tabs, but Safari introduced them in its version 1.x. Opera added them in Opera 8 (with the option to revert to the real MDI buttons like it always had had). The Firefox team is the only one that did some serious usability research some time ago, and the change in Firefox 2 is the result of this research.

    Saved sessions (autorestore after crash, or always if you want) have been with Opera since Opera 4 or 5. Omniweb on Mac also has extensive session features. Firefox 2 is now getting some – and IE7 doesn’t have them, nor Safari, IIANM.

    Like

  31. Hey,Opera is faster.
    Opera 9 doesn’t have any banners anymore and it just rocks with the ease of use. Firefox with the ‘fasterfox’ extension is very good though.

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  32. Hey,Opera is faster.
    Opera 9 doesn’t have any banners anymore and it just rocks with the ease of use. Firefox with the ‘fasterfox’ extension is very good though.

    Like

  33. I’ve recently converted to Firefox after years on Internet Explorer, and I’m very pleased with the browser so far. I haven’t downloaded any addons yet, but I may do one day.

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  34. I’ve recently converted to Firefox after years on Internet Explorer, and I’m very pleased with the browser so far. I haven’t downloaded any addons yet, but I may do one day.

    Like

  35. I am just trying out the new release of IE7, and find it interesting all the debate about this release versus the Firefox download. One of the most interesting aspects of the IE vs. Firefox battle is the development of the ecosystem of extensions or add-ons. It’s not just about bugs and features. Right now Firefox had a great advantage in this space but you can see Microsoft trying to catch up.
    I noticed an interesting extension called Trailfire, set up as a recommended download for IE7. See link:

    http://www.ieaddons.com/SearchResults.aspx?keywords=trailfire

    I think the ecosystem for Firefox and IE will decide who wins this battle. What do you think?

    Like

  36. I am just trying out the new release of IE7, and find it interesting all the debate about this release versus the Firefox download. One of the most interesting aspects of the IE vs. Firefox battle is the development of the ecosystem of extensions or add-ons. It’s not just about bugs and features. Right now Firefox had a great advantage in this space but you can see Microsoft trying to catch up.
    I noticed an interesting extension called Trailfire, set up as a recommended download for IE7. See link:

    http://www.ieaddons.com/SearchResults.aspx?keywords=trailfire

    I think the ecosystem for Firefox and IE will decide who wins this battle. What do you think?

    Like

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