Wow, Vic Gundotra leaves Microsoft for Google

Interesting, Vic Gundotra leaves Microsoft, Business 2.0 says, to take a year off and then head to Google.

Vic is the guy who hired me into Microsoft and is one of the people who made me believe. I will never forget his pitch to me to join Microsoft: “this might be good for your career.”

Thanks Vic for everything and good luck in your future career.

+++++

Brain drain at Microsoft?

Is there a brain drain going on at Microsoft? It sure looks that way but keep in mind that Vic and I didn’t write code. We didn’t make the products.

Those of us who — whether deserved or not — become public faces of companies can wildly change the perceptions of those companies.

There are 60,000+ people working at Microsoft. Not two or three. Or even 15.

What’s ironic is I met quite a few employees at Microsoft who used to work at Google. No one talks about them.

On the other hand, this is a win for Google and a loss for Microsoft. They got a good guy.

By the way, I tried to call Vic for several hours tonight to get his comment and he didn’t return my calls. I didn’t know either Vic was going to leave before today, either, although when we talked recently about my own career I could tell he was considering life changes as well.

78 thoughts on “Wow, Vic Gundotra leaves Microsoft for Google

  1. As a former employee, I always thought of him as a slimy snake; not surprised to see him switch sides for pure financial gain; it sure is a loss to MS thoug.

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  2. As a former employee, I always thought of him as a slimy snake; not surprised to see him switch sides for pure financial gain; it sure is a loss to MS thoug.

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  4. @Tejas: People have been moving in and out MS for 20-something years. The visibility of the people involved doesn’t really make a huge difference, except perhaps in recruiting. 2-3 people in a company of tens of thousands quit, and it turns into a big deal ? Only in the blogosphere.

    @Hasan: Yeah, it must be that. Because, MS obviously doesn’t have the cash.

    @Scoble: Yes, and I (sometimes) meet Salesforce people who turned down jobs at Google. Weird? Maybe. But no one talks about them either. I won’t say it’s a Google conspiracy, but the blogosphere is quite enchanted by them.

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  5. @Tejas: People have been moving in and out MS for 20-something years. The visibility of the people involved doesn’t really make a huge difference, except perhaps in recruiting. 2-3 people in a company of tens of thousands quit, and it turns into a big deal ? Only in the blogosphere.

    @Hasan: Yeah, it must be that. Because, MS obviously doesn’t have the cash.

    @Scoble: Yes, and I (sometimes) meet Salesforce people who turned down jobs at Google. Weird? Maybe. But no one talks about them either. I won’t say it’s a Google conspiracy, but the blogosphere is quite enchanted by them.

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  6. I would like to think that people moving out of Microsoft is a very very small percentage which in turn is probably way above better than industry standards. Just a hunch…

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  7. I would like to think that people moving out of Microsoft is a very very small percentage which in turn is probably way above better than industry standards. Just a hunch…

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  8. I agree with Hasan that most probably the financial benefit is the key reason. Microsoft should take this matter seriously. Losing an experienced employee is never a good thing for any company.

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  9. I agree with Hasan that most probably the financial benefit is the key reason. Microsoft should take this matter seriously. Losing an experienced employee is never a good thing for any company.

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  10. @Kingsley
    it can become a big deal. As I now respect companies like Microsoft and Google, not only for their brilliant software developers but for the people who represent the company as a human voice on the blogosphere.

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  11. @Kingsley
    it can become a big deal. As I now respect companies like Microsoft and Google, not only for their brilliant software developers but for the people who represent the company as a human voice on the blogosphere.

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  12. So, Robert, how’s it feel to be a “Disgustingly public face”?

    Perhaps there are one or two, even more “disgustingly public”, faces, that you could suggest, as being still incumbent at Microsoft, that might actually benefit the company by “making way for others”?

    On, wait! It’s Mini’s job, to make those suggetions, isn’t it?

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  13. So, Robert, how’s it feel to be a “Disgustingly public face”?

    Perhaps there are one or two, even more “disgustingly public”, faces, that you could suggest, as being still incumbent at Microsoft, that might actually benefit the company by “making way for others”?

    On, wait! It’s Mini’s job, to make those suggetions, isn’t it?

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  14. I think the real question is what is the overall turnover rate? and how much is voluntary? And how does it compare with the industry?

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  15. I think the real question is what is the overall turnover rate? and how much is voluntary? And how does it compare with the industry?

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  16. OK, that “disgustingly public face” referred to the politicians who represent us. I think it’s obvious when you read the post, but maybe it doesn’t come through as well on the trackback.

    Tejas, do tell me who represents Google in the blogosphere, especially someone who’s leaving would make them look bad?

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  17. OK, that “disgustingly public face” referred to the politicians who represent us. I think it’s obvious when you read the post, but maybe it doesn’t come through as well on the trackback.

    Tejas, do tell me who represents Google in the blogosphere, especially someone who’s leaving would make them look bad?

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  20. “Whatโ€™s ironic is I met quite a few employees at Microsoft who used to work at Google. No one talks about them.”

    Say it louder. I think nobody noticed…
    (just adding to the irony)

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  21. “Whatโ€™s ironic is I met quite a few employees at Microsoft who used to work at Google. No one talks about them.”

    Say it louder. I think nobody noticed…
    (just adding to the irony)

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  22. @20. They cryptic way in which the Taylor’s departure was reported makes me wonder if he wasn’t pushed rather than “left”

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  23. @20. They cryptic way in which the Taylor’s departure was reported makes me wonder if he wasn’t pushed rather than “left”

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  25. I would be surprised if the reason if purely financial. Microsoft are the old boys of the technology circle, good is new. Even apple do a better job of attracting talent….

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  26. I would be surprised if the reason if purely financial. Microsoft are the old boys of the technology circle, good is new. Even apple do a better job of attracting talent….

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  27. “Tejas, do tell me who represents Google in the blogosphere, especially someone whoโ€™s leaving would make them look bad?”

    Mark Jen. Do a search on Google, Kingsley (or do you use MSN, as a matter of principle ;))

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  28. “Tejas, do tell me who represents Google in the blogosphere, especially someone whoโ€™s leaving would make them look bad?”

    Mark Jen. Do a search on Google, Kingsley (or do you use MSN, as a matter of principle ;))

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  29. Are you going to join GOOG after a year, just like Vic? ๐Ÿ™‚
    Vic can afford to take a one year break, not many of us can.

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  30. Are you going to join GOOG after a year, just like Vic? ๐Ÿ™‚
    Vic can afford to take a one year break, not many of us can.

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  31. TAG,

    That’s a very clever move from Robert ๐Ÿ™‚ Made it look like a joke.

    Anyway Robert, I wish you the best for your job at podtech. I am not a big fan of Pods, but it’s good to know that you will continue to blog.

    Cheers

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  32. TAG,

    That’s a very clever move from Robert ๐Ÿ™‚ Made it look like a joke.

    Anyway Robert, I wish you the best for your job at podtech. I am not a big fan of Pods, but it’s good to know that you will continue to blog.

    Cheers

    Like

  33. Sure, there are 60,000 people still left at MS. But the fact that so many “high profile” execs have been/are leaving is of course going to raise eyebrows. And not just in the blogosphere either.

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  34. Sure, there are 60,000 people still left at MS. But the fact that so many “high profile” execs have been/are leaving is of course going to raise eyebrows. And not just in the blogosphere either.

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  35. Good for Google and Vic. Fifteen plus years at the same company could be boring, and now Google hired the best.
    If you see this, Vic, call me. It’s been awhile.

    ~lea in Seattle

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  36. Good for Google and Vic. Fifteen plus years at the same company could be boring, and now Google hired the best.
    If you see this, Vic, call me. It’s been awhile.

    ~lea in Seattle

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