Wifi in planes horrible business

Looks like Boeing is giving up on Wifi in planes because they've lost a billion and don't see that their investment will come back. Funny, didn't JetBlue just pay big dollars to add that to all their planes? 

I used the Boeing service on an SAS flight to Copenhagen and loved it. The problem wasn't with the Wifi. But there was a major problem elsewhere that'll keep people from using it: power.

My batteries in my laptop (and in most laptops I see on planes) last about two hours. Yeah, some models last four to eight, if you have additional "big" batteries. But most last about two hours the way you buy them out of the store.

So, how do you get power on the SAS flight? You have to buy a $250 upgrade each way. Prohibitive for most people. I actually tried to upgrade cause I wanted to do some work. Turned out those seats were sold out in both directions.

Long and short of it is that we aren't going to see Wifi in most planes anytime soon. 

77 thoughts on “Wifi in planes horrible business

  1. Agreed about power (or lack thereof) being a large part of the reason this product didn’t work out. It’s unbelievable to me that a company with as much talent and money as Boeing was unable to work out such a small detail as that.

    I understand that some problems are unforeseeable when designing a product, but that one isn’t lying too deep under the surface.

    That’s quite a setback for travelers.

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  2. Agreed about power (or lack thereof) being a large part of the reason this product didn’t work out. It’s unbelievable to me that a company with as much talent and money as Boeing was unable to work out such a small detail as that.

    I understand that some problems are unforeseeable when designing a product, but that one isn’t lying too deep under the surface.

    That’s quite a setback for travelers.

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  3. Hi Scob. You have reason, the problem energy for the wi-fi is one large limitation. According to you the Wi-MAX is not one possible solution? As for the mobile devices would want an energy to us alternative.

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  4. Hi Scob. You have reason, the problem energy for the wi-fi is one large limitation. According to you the Wi-MAX is not one possible solution? As for the mobile devices would want an energy to us alternative.

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  5. Aren’t you contradicting yourself re power?

    Prohibitive for most people but the seats were sold out in both directions?

    I can see a money making opportunity here, reselling access to the outlet with a power bar. πŸ™‚

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  6. Aren’t you contradicting yourself re power?

    Prohibitive for most people but the seats were sold out in both directions?

    I can see a money making opportunity here, reselling access to the outlet with a power bar. πŸ™‚

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  7. Patrick: the problem isn’t necessarily the WIFI itself. Laptops just use a lot of power and it’s hard to design one that uses less, or that has big enough batteries to last a 10 hour flight. Most people don’t buy extra batteries because most people don’t take 10 hour flights very often so the market isn’t that large.

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  8. Patrick: the problem isn’t necessarily the WIFI itself. Laptops just use a lot of power and it’s hard to design one that uses less, or that has big enough batteries to last a 10 hour flight. Most people don’t buy extra batteries because most people don’t take 10 hour flights very often so the market isn’t that large.

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  9. It’s not a power issue, it’s an economic one, not enough people wanting to pay for said service, and the pricing was well out of wack. And not enough airlines seeing enough demand to justify. I knew it was in danger, the second you guys took your junket flight, if you recall my predictions. πŸ™‚ Pitching to fuzzy bloggers, long after Biz Travelers and Airlines said no…

    As for power, you could get an Electrovaya PowerPad, it’s not a BIG battery, it’s a flat surface. Or coulda just got the Scribbler. But what? Even old Toshiba Tablet’s ran in 3-5 hours on Wi-Fi, you mean to tell me your Lenovo ThinkPad only gets two? Gawd, that’s as bad as your Pent III era NEC. And what about hot swapping? And what of APC’s Universal Notebook battery, with a pure 8 hour and around 4 on Wifi? All sorts of solutions here. All sorts.

    Geesh, some Road Warrior geek you are. πŸ˜‰

    PS – And…you running Aero? πŸ˜‰

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  10. It’s not a power issue, it’s an economic one, not enough people wanting to pay for said service, and the pricing was well out of wack. And not enough airlines seeing enough demand to justify. I knew it was in danger, the second you guys took your junket flight, if you recall my predictions. πŸ™‚ Pitching to fuzzy bloggers, long after Biz Travelers and Airlines said no…

    As for power, you could get an Electrovaya PowerPad, it’s not a BIG battery, it’s a flat surface. Or coulda just got the Scribbler. But what? Even old Toshiba Tablet’s ran in 3-5 hours on Wi-Fi, you mean to tell me your Lenovo ThinkPad only gets two? Gawd, that’s as bad as your Pent III era NEC. And what about hot swapping? And what of APC’s Universal Notebook battery, with a pure 8 hour and around 4 on Wifi? All sorts of solutions here. All sorts.

    Geesh, some Road Warrior geek you are. πŸ˜‰

    PS – And…you running Aero? πŸ˜‰

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  11. Alex: most of those seats go to frequent fliers. But, yes, there’s a market there. Put power in every seat and charge for that.

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  12. Alex: most of those seats go to frequent fliers. But, yes, there’s a market there. Put power in every seat and charge for that.

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  13. I flew from PGH to LAX last summer on US Air. Every seat on the plane had in-seat power for laptops and other devices. I had to buy a fairly inexpensive adaptor from Targus to connect my laptop to the power source. My son and I enjoyed video games and DVDs to and from LA. Trust me, it was a great way to keep a 5 year old occupied during our vacation.

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  14. I flew from PGH to LAX last summer on US Air. Every seat on the plane had in-seat power for laptops and other devices. I had to buy a fairly inexpensive adaptor from Targus to connect my laptop to the power source. My son and I enjoyed video games and DVDs to and from LA. Trust me, it was a great way to keep a 5 year old occupied during our vacation.

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  15. I got an old Dell X300 with the extended battery; it’s fine. But the reason all these wireles ventures are failing:

    THEY CHARGE YOU THROUGH THE F-ING NOSE.

    Sorry for the caps; I just needed to vent I guess.
    I travel all over Europe for work and the prices hotels, airports and others dare to charge for what we all know is a low-low-cost investment is obscene.

    Ah well, I really don’t need wi-fi on a plane anyway; I gots me a Nintendo DS.

    What I need is a ban on the imminent irritation of in-flight cellphone calls: because that is going to cost lives. Not from technical technical malfunctions; but because I am going to have to kill the yapping idiot who needs to tell all his friends ‘I’m calling from a plane. What? No, a plane. What are you having for dinner?’. Salesmen beware: I accept your incessant yapping on the cell because I can move aware. In a closed space at high altitude I will be going straight for the jugular.

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  16. I got an old Dell X300 with the extended battery; it’s fine. But the reason all these wireles ventures are failing:

    THEY CHARGE YOU THROUGH THE F-ING NOSE.

    Sorry for the caps; I just needed to vent I guess.
    I travel all over Europe for work and the prices hotels, airports and others dare to charge for what we all know is a low-low-cost investment is obscene.

    Ah well, I really don’t need wi-fi on a plane anyway; I gots me a Nintendo DS.

    What I need is a ban on the imminent irritation of in-flight cellphone calls: because that is going to cost lives. Not from technical technical malfunctions; but because I am going to have to kill the yapping idiot who needs to tell all his friends ‘I’m calling from a plane. What? No, a plane. What are you having for dinner?’. Salesmen beware: I accept your incessant yapping on the cell because I can move aware. In a closed space at high altitude I will be going straight for the jugular.

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  17. I just scanned the comments and stumbled across Robert’s “Alex: most of those seats go to frequent fliers. But, yes, there’s a market there. Put power in every seat and charge for that.”

    Look, not everything is a friggin’ market. Some things are cool to offer as SERVICE. Free in-flight wireless? SERVICE. Free in-flight power: SERVICE. This will get you a loyal customer base.

    Get rid of the useless flight attendants (put a drink dispenser and snack machine in the back, put on a safety instruction tape, and nobody really wants to eat the meals anyway) and use to money to provide people with some actual SERVICE instead of treating them like cattle and/or potential bomb-carriers.

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  18. I just scanned the comments and stumbled across Robert’s “Alex: most of those seats go to frequent fliers. But, yes, there’s a market there. Put power in every seat and charge for that.”

    Look, not everything is a friggin’ market. Some things are cool to offer as SERVICE. Free in-flight wireless? SERVICE. Free in-flight power: SERVICE. This will get you a loyal customer base.

    Get rid of the useless flight attendants (put a drink dispenser and snack machine in the back, put on a safety instruction tape, and nobody really wants to eat the meals anyway) and use to money to provide people with some actual SERVICE instead of treating them like cattle and/or potential bomb-carriers.

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  19. Extra batteries. But I’m amazed at the new nomad roaming the airports these days – business traveler in search of a power outlet! New trival item – a screwdriver to undue those outlet covers on the floors at the gates. But try getting a srewdriver through TSA these days. I’m still holding out for cold-fusion-powered-laptops!

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  20. Extra batteries. But I’m amazed at the new nomad roaming the airports these days – business traveler in search of a power outlet! New trival item – a screwdriver to undue those outlet covers on the floors at the gates. But try getting a srewdriver through TSA these days. I’m still holding out for cold-fusion-powered-laptops!

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  21. That begs a further question, which one? Toshiba 3500 or the M200/M400? 3500 was a royal disaster, so yes I can see that, 2 hours would actually be lucky. But that tester M200 I had got 4 easy and M400’s (and Tecra M4’s) are even better. But the power issue and lack of fuel cells, is more an issue as to why Tablets and UMPC’s haven’t caught on, over super-expensive Airline WiFi.

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  22. That begs a further question, which one? Toshiba 3500 or the M200/M400? 3500 was a royal disaster, so yes I can see that, 2 hours would actually be lucky. But that tester M200 I had got 4 easy and M400’s (and Tecra M4’s) are even better. But the power issue and lack of fuel cells, is more an issue as to why Tablets and UMPC’s haven’t caught on, over super-expensive Airline WiFi.

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  23. Um..Michiel, if you think that flight attendents are no more than high-altitude wait staff, I HIGHLY recommend you see about doing some observation of the training they get.

    It will quickly disabuse you of that notion.

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  24. Um..Michiel, if you think that flight attendents are no more than high-altitude wait staff, I HIGHLY recommend you see about doing some observation of the training they get.

    It will quickly disabuse you of that notion.

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  25. Chris: it was an M400. My battery only lasted more than three if I turned down the screen, turned off the hard drive, turned off Wifi, etc. But I’m a heavy computer user and don’t just do email.

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  26. Chris: it was an M400. My battery only lasted more than three if I turned down the screen, turned off the hard drive, turned off Wifi, etc. But I’m a heavy computer user and don’t just do email.

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  27. John: I agree. I wouldn’t get on a plane without them.

    Anyway, yeah, they charge a lot for these things. Funny, though, I am willing to pay! I’d even pay $30 for a short-range flight. But, that’s just me. Being online is worth money in my business.

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  28. John: I agree. I wouldn’t get on a plane without them.

    Anyway, yeah, they charge a lot for these things. Funny, though, I am willing to pay! I’d even pay $30 for a short-range flight. But, that’s just me. Being online is worth money in my business.

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  29. PS – Your ‘SERVICES’ have to deal in ROI, Michiel. And if no demand for services, or small demand, makes no economic sense — it’s a loss, if it doesn’t help the overall bottom-line. Geesh, Biz Economics 101.

    Useless flight attendants? They are far more than drink distributors. Ummm, you start a airline like that then. Insolvent in a week.

    But here’s the real reasons…”power” but is a geek thing.

    1. Airlines don’t see much demand. And no ROI. Unlike alotta geeks and Joi Ito copycats, the mainstream biz travelers, like time off-the-grid.
    2. Pricing that is literally CRAZY. And perception that it should be free. Can anyone say limited return?
    3. Cellphone use, more a demand. People use phones more than PDAs and Laptop’s. WiFi is geeky. Cellphones are everyone.

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  30. PS – Your ‘SERVICES’ have to deal in ROI, Michiel. And if no demand for services, or small demand, makes no economic sense — it’s a loss, if it doesn’t help the overall bottom-line. Geesh, Biz Economics 101.

    Useless flight attendants? They are far more than drink distributors. Ummm, you start a airline like that then. Insolvent in a week.

    But here’s the real reasons…”power” but is a geek thing.

    1. Airlines don’t see much demand. And no ROI. Unlike alotta geeks and Joi Ito copycats, the mainstream biz travelers, like time off-the-grid.
    2. Pricing that is literally CRAZY. And perception that it should be free. Can anyone say limited return?
    3. Cellphone use, more a demand. People use phones more than PDAs and Laptop’s. WiFi is geeky. Cellphones are everyone.

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  31. heavy computer user

    Well, so am I. But something you do drinks more power than most mortals. πŸ™‚ But even the M400 had an integrated hot-swappable bay.

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  32. heavy computer user

    Well, so am I. But something you do drinks more power than most mortals. πŸ™‚ But even the M400 had an integrated hot-swappable bay.

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  33. News release 1:

    FAA is banning laptop and batteries from carry-on luggages as an effect to fight terrorism.

    Uh…….

    News release 2

    UAL announced DS and XBox 360 rental on its international flights.

    Uh………..

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  34. News release 1:

    FAA is banning laptop and batteries from carry-on luggages as an effect to fight terrorism.

    Uh…….

    News release 2

    UAL announced DS and XBox 360 rental on its international flights.

    Uh………..

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  35. More and more devices have native wi-fi; see the current crop of handheld gaming devices. I am sure music players and cell phones will follow suit. There will be more and more demand for wifi.

    And all those devices require power because battery technology STILL sucks. There’s been no drastic breakthough although the future always looks bright. It’s also always just over the horizon.

    Google with its free wireless services is on the right track here. There is a VERY limited business model for squeezing money out of wireless access and it will be obliterated by ubiquity.

    Oh, and yes, I do see flight attendants and possibly even pilots as vestiges of a past age: kept only to keep the cattle quiet (“oh thank god, someone is in control”). Sorry if that offends or anything.

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  36. More and more devices have native wi-fi; see the current crop of handheld gaming devices. I am sure music players and cell phones will follow suit. There will be more and more demand for wifi.

    And all those devices require power because battery technology STILL sucks. There’s been no drastic breakthough although the future always looks bright. It’s also always just over the horizon.

    Google with its free wireless services is on the right track here. There is a VERY limited business model for squeezing money out of wireless access and it will be obliterated by ubiquity.

    Oh, and yes, I do see flight attendants and possibly even pilots as vestiges of a past age: kept only to keep the cattle quiet (“oh thank god, someone is in control”). Sorry if that offends or anything.

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  37. I found that Connexions was broken yesterday when I flew Lufthansa from Denver to Frankfurt. Their customer support couldn’t help.

    You’re right – they are giving up on it.

    The power is also a problem regardless of internet access or not. At-seat power is only available in business/first on international flights – and rarely on any plane on domestic flights.

    Until there is at-seat power across the board – we’ll be doing off-line email for a few hours (I get almost 5 hours with my Thinkpad with the internal and secondary battery) – and that’s it.

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  38. I found that Connexions was broken yesterday when I flew Lufthansa from Denver to Frankfurt. Their customer support couldn’t help.

    You’re right – they are giving up on it.

    The power is also a problem regardless of internet access or not. At-seat power is only available in business/first on international flights – and rarely on any plane on domestic flights.

    Until there is at-seat power across the board – we’ll be doing off-line email for a few hours (I get almost 5 hours with my Thinkpad with the internal and secondary battery) – and that’s it.

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  39. There are battery solutions for devices that don’t require a $250 upgrade, like the Inflight Power Recharger Cables. Not a perfect solution but it gets there.

    More to the greater point about WiFi on planes – it’s priced in a way that doesn’t make sense for normal people. The same way hotels should build in the cost of Internet into rooms and call it a “free perk” so should the airlines who provide the service charge a few bucks extra for a ticket and call it “free”. That way everyone could use it if they want to instead of making it practical only for the front row seats.

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  40. There are battery solutions for devices that don’t require a $250 upgrade, like the Inflight Power Recharger Cables. Not a perfect solution but it gets there.

    More to the greater point about WiFi on planes – it’s priced in a way that doesn’t make sense for normal people. The same way hotels should build in the cost of Internet into rooms and call it a “free perk” so should the airlines who provide the service charge a few bucks extra for a ticket and call it “free”. That way everyone could use it if they want to instead of making it practical only for the front row seats.

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  41. How about charging from the headphone port via USB?

    http://www.engadget.com/2006/06/15/inflight-usb-power-unit-uses-audio-jack-to-give-you-juice/

    This is an interesting development, because Connexion is not only used on planes: Boeing has been pushing it to ocean freighter companies as a way to provide communications access that is rather cheaper than the asynchronous methods used by ships at sea now. (Although Inmarsat positioning is now required, so they couldn’t shut that down.)

    My company, Navarik (http://www.navarik.com) makes web-based software for those companies, mostly used onshore, but right now we have some ship-side components that send XML over asynchronous AMOS email that would be much improved by real-tim Connexion services. It would suck if that roll-out didn’t happen.

    Then again, Boeing has apparently been having major reliability problems with the ship-side transceiver hardware, which doesn’t seem to have been designed for the rigours of salt water and rough weather. It’s surprisingly much gentler up there in the troposphere.

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  42. How about charging from the headphone port via USB?

    http://www.engadget.com/2006/06/15/inflight-usb-power-unit-uses-audio-jack-to-give-you-juice/

    This is an interesting development, because Connexion is not only used on planes: Boeing has been pushing it to ocean freighter companies as a way to provide communications access that is rather cheaper than the asynchronous methods used by ships at sea now. (Although Inmarsat positioning is now required, so they couldn’t shut that down.)

    My company, Navarik (http://www.navarik.com) makes web-based software for those companies, mostly used onshore, but right now we have some ship-side components that send XML over asynchronous AMOS email that would be much improved by real-tim Connexion services. It would suck if that roll-out didn’t happen.

    Then again, Boeing has apparently been having major reliability problems with the ship-side transceiver hardware, which doesn’t seem to have been designed for the rigours of salt water and rough weather. It’s surprisingly much gentler up there in the troposphere.

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  43. Jake: the problem is I’ve only taken two 10-hour flights. That’s not enough to justify carrying things and spending more money before the flight. The seat upgrade came with other things that made justifying that easier (bigger seat, better food).

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  44. Jake: the problem is I’ve only taken two 10-hour flights. That’s not enough to justify carrying things and spending more money before the flight. The seat upgrade came with other things that made justifying that easier (bigger seat, better food).

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  45. I’m surprised that no one has posted about this yet, but United’s p.s. (Premium Service) flights have power for every seat and do not require any adapters. p.s. operates LAX – JFK and SFO – JFK. These days p.s. flights are in very high demand. When p.s. first came out about a year and a half ago, you could get these flights for about the same as any of the transcontinental flights UA flew (e.g., EWR – SFO). Now, they’re definitely more expensive.

    Here’s some detail from United.com
    http://www.united.com/press/detail/0,6862,53297-1,00.html

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  46. I’m surprised that no one has posted about this yet, but United’s p.s. (Premium Service) flights have power for every seat and do not require any adapters. p.s. operates LAX – JFK and SFO – JFK. These days p.s. flights are in very high demand. When p.s. first came out about a year and a half ago, you could get these flights for about the same as any of the transcontinental flights UA flew (e.g., EWR – SFO). Now, they’re definitely more expensive.

    Here’s some detail from United.com
    http://www.united.com/press/detail/0,6862,53297-1,00.html

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  47. What’s wrong with just reading a book or some printed materials while on the plane? Shirley there’s enough out there to keep one occupied for that long.

    I’m puzzled by this need to be working on the laptop all the time. It is like people like to be a slave to them.

    I’m aware that this could be turned against me for using a computer at work — but your office (home or otherwise) is where you use your computer. You don’t use a computer when you’re squished in with 150 other people in seats that are too small and people trying to pass you to go to a restroom.

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  48. What’s wrong with just reading a book or some printed materials while on the plane? Shirley there’s enough out there to keep one occupied for that long.

    I’m puzzled by this need to be working on the laptop all the time. It is like people like to be a slave to them.

    I’m aware that this could be turned against me for using a computer at work — but your office (home or otherwise) is where you use your computer. You don’t use a computer when you’re squished in with 150 other people in seats that are too small and people trying to pass you to go to a restroom.

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  49. Blog: I have 950 unanswered emails. I like reading RSS feeds more than I like reading books or magazines.

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  50. Blog: I have 950 unanswered emails. I like reading RSS feeds more than I like reading books or magazines.

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  51. Verizon just announced it was ending its old Airphone service – not that was a product which failed due to bad pricing. After all the capital investment, you think they would have charged somewhat more than variable cost and made it up in volume…but that was a telco …if they were running Fedex they would charge $ 200 for each package…there is a similar opportunity/risk with WI FI on planes…I would gladly pay $ 3-4 an hour…on the battery – I have bribed flight attendants to plug mine into a business class outlet while I slept in coach…times when I have been upgraded on Delta, fewer than 10% of outlets are in use…

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  52. Verizon just announced it was ending its old Airphone service – not that was a product which failed due to bad pricing. After all the capital investment, you think they would have charged somewhat more than variable cost and made it up in volume…but that was a telco …if they were running Fedex they would charge $ 200 for each package…there is a similar opportunity/risk with WI FI on planes…I would gladly pay $ 3-4 an hour…on the battery – I have bribed flight attendants to plug mine into a business class outlet while I slept in coach…times when I have been upgraded on Delta, fewer than 10% of outlets are in use…

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  53. @30. Thus your cluelessness about the real world.

    (And quit calling him ‘Shirley”)

    Anyway, I’m with Chris and BlogReader on this. I’ve seem fewer and fewer people opening up their laptops, even on international business class, over the past few years. Seems many are welcoming being disconnected. I personally don’t want to take the risk of someone looking over my shoulder at my work.

    For dweebs like Scoble who apparently get goose-pimple bone when they’ve gone less than an hour without reading a feed this has some appeal. But, it seems even for you, Scoble, the price point is too high. Like others have said, this is a basic Econ 101 problem that Boeing apparently failed to analyze.

    Michiel, flight attendants vesigates of the past? No offense but I don’t think I want to depend on you to help evacuate the plane in an emergency. You can’t be serious about your perception, can you?

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  54. @30. Thus your cluelessness about the real world.

    (And quit calling him ‘Shirley”)

    Anyway, I’m with Chris and BlogReader on this. I’ve seem fewer and fewer people opening up their laptops, even on international business class, over the past few years. Seems many are welcoming being disconnected. I personally don’t want to take the risk of someone looking over my shoulder at my work.

    For dweebs like Scoble who apparently get goose-pimple bone when they’ve gone less than an hour without reading a feed this has some appeal. But, it seems even for you, Scoble, the price point is too high. Like others have said, this is a basic Econ 101 problem that Boeing apparently failed to analyze.

    Michiel, flight attendants vesigates of the past? No offense but I don’t think I want to depend on you to help evacuate the plane in an emergency. You can’t be serious about your perception, can you?

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  55. The problem is, Connexion isn’t cheap to maintain and upgrade, but there’s just no way you could ever charge enough to pay for it. The volume’s not there either, because if it’s a short haul, well, even Robert can be offline for a couple-three hours, and the longer flights aren’t going to make enough money on it, because most business travel is short range. That’s not to say that there’s no long range business travel, but it’s not the majority. So who pays for it?

    It’s a nice idea, and for things like ships, it makes a lot of sense. But it would be a money loser if you expected passengers to pay for it, and no business can just burn money to be “nice guys”

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  56. The problem is, Connexion isn’t cheap to maintain and upgrade, but there’s just no way you could ever charge enough to pay for it. The volume’s not there either, because if it’s a short haul, well, even Robert can be offline for a couple-three hours, and the longer flights aren’t going to make enough money on it, because most business travel is short range. That’s not to say that there’s no long range business travel, but it’s not the majority. So who pays for it?

    It’s a nice idea, and for things like ships, it makes a lot of sense. But it would be a money loser if you expected passengers to pay for it, and no business can just burn money to be “nice guys”

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  57. scoble Blog: I have 950 unanswered emails. I like reading RSS feeds more than I like reading books or magazines.

    No offense, but that’s part of the problem. People like sound bite answers that can be summed up on a single webpage and don’t want to delve into anything. I find myself slipping into that on the web as well — if it is more than a couple of pages my think bone starts to hurt.

    You can say that it points you in a new direction for something interesting. Yeah, well until another shiny thing pops up on the internets. RSS feeds are to ADHD as liquor is to an alcoholic. Bah humbug!

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  58. scoble Blog: I have 950 unanswered emails. I like reading RSS feeds more than I like reading books or magazines.

    No offense, but that’s part of the problem. People like sound bite answers that can be summed up on a single webpage and don’t want to delve into anything. I find myself slipping into that on the web as well — if it is more than a couple of pages my think bone starts to hurt.

    You can say that it points you in a new direction for something interesting. Yeah, well until another shiny thing pops up on the internets. RSS feeds are to ADHD as liquor is to an alcoholic. Bah humbug!

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  59. BlogReader: I am definitely an addict. But, I disagree with you. The best posts, and the ones definitely worth thinking about, are the longer ones that make a point and just aren’t links off to another Web site.

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  60. BlogReader: I am definitely an addict. But, I disagree with you. The best posts, and the ones definitely worth thinking about, are the longer ones that make a point and just aren’t links off to another Web site.

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  61. Dmad: if you are ever in a non-fatal plane crash I surely hope you won’t wait on some air bimbo to tell you how to proceed; claw your way to the nearest emergency exit and get out.

    And as for pilots: did you know the most common cause of a plane crash is pilot error? http://www.planecrashinfo.com/cause.htm
    Not to say a fully automated system would be better, I get chills when I think of taking a robot flight powered by Microsoft Air(tm) (or would the be Aero?) πŸ˜›

    Flight attendants, oxygen masks, seat belts: all more for a sense of safety than acual safety.

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  62. Dmad: if you are ever in a non-fatal plane crash I surely hope you won’t wait on some air bimbo to tell you how to proceed; claw your way to the nearest emergency exit and get out.

    And as for pilots: did you know the most common cause of a plane crash is pilot error? http://www.planecrashinfo.com/cause.htm
    Not to say a fully automated system would be better, I get chills when I think of taking a robot flight powered by Microsoft Air(tm) (or would the be Aero?) πŸ˜›

    Flight attendants, oxygen masks, seat belts: all more for a sense of safety than acual safety.

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  63. @36. Not sure if I will wait or not. But, neither am I going to take my chances that there is some random passenger on board that can assist me if I, oh I dunno, have a heart attack or some other life threatening illness.

    Sure most common cause is pilot error, that doesn’t suggest getting rid of pilots. What system decides if the plane suddenly needs to land?

    For example, what automated system is going to get a plane out of this?

    http://www.foxnews.com/video2/player05.html?092105/oreilly_jetblue2_092105&OReilly_Factor&Safe%20Landing&acc&U.S.%20%26%20World&-1&exp

    I’m guessing you don’t fly much.

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  64. @36. Not sure if I will wait or not. But, neither am I going to take my chances that there is some random passenger on board that can assist me if I, oh I dunno, have a heart attack or some other life threatening illness.

    Sure most common cause is pilot error, that doesn’t suggest getting rid of pilots. What system decides if the plane suddenly needs to land?

    For example, what automated system is going to get a plane out of this?

    http://www.foxnews.com/video2/player05.html?092105/oreilly_jetblue2_092105&OReilly_Factor&Safe%20Landing&acc&U.S.%20%26%20World&-1&exp

    I’m guessing you don’t fly much.

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  65. Power in coach is the single most important factor in my tenacious loyalty to American Airlines. And the rest of the service doesn’t suck more than any other airline I’ve tried.

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  66. Power in coach is the single most important factor in my tenacious loyalty to American Airlines. And the rest of the service doesn’t suck more than any other airline I’ve tried.

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